Get the Facts on Employer Credit Checks

employer credit checks

You may already know that if you have poor credit, you may have difficulty obtaining a car loan, mortgage, or credit card. But did you know that you could also jeopardize your candidacy for a job? Many employers run background credit checks on job candidates. By reviewing a candidate’s financial history, it is thought that employers are better able to weed out candidates who have previously demonstrated irresponsibility or who may be more likely to pilfer from the office petty cash. Unfortunately, many responsible job candidates are at risk of being turned down for a position because of credit report errors. If you have suffered damages of this nature, consider talking to a credit lawyer located near Fairfax. A credit lawyer at a consumer law practice can help you get these mistakes corrected.

credit lawyer located near Fairfax

Checking Your Credit Reports

If you are in the market for a new job and there may be a possibility that potential employers will check your credit history, it may be a good idea to check your credit reports in advance. It can take months to fix credit report errors; staying on top of your financial information is crucial. If you do find errors, consider contacting a credit lawyer for help fixing them.

Signing a Release Form

Employers are not allowed to check your credit history without your permission. You will be asked to sign a release form. Of course, you can choose not to sign the release form. However, refusing your permission for a credit check is not likely to lead to a job offer. You should retain copies of all documents that you sign or that you are provided by prospective employers including any application that you complete.

Consider Disclosing Additional Information

If you choose to sign the release form and you already know that your credit history is less than favorable, you could provide an explanation to the hiring manager. For example, you could say that you are currently disputing erroneous information on your credit report and that the information currently available is not an accurate representation of your fiscal responsibility. If the information is accurate, but unfavorable, you could still offer an explanation if you choose. You might say that you have unpaid medical bills due to a family member’s long, unexpected illness, for instance, and you are working to repay these bills. However, it is your choice whether to disclose your financial information to a prospective employer.

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